Women’s cotton cuffs owned by Frances Sheckles McMillan of Kentucky, no date given but from the cuffs and item description I surmise ca. 1820-1850.
From the Kentucky Historical Society.

Women’s cotton cuffs owned by Frances Sheckles McMillan of Kentucky, no date given but from the cuffs and item description I surmise ca. 1820-1850.

From the Kentucky Historical Society.

1. Beaded linen coin purse (British), ca. 1780-1810.

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

2. Beaded linen coin purse, ca. 1780-1810.

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

3. Small knitted silk and bead bag (British), ca. 1800-1850.

From the Victoria & Albert Museum.

4. Knitted silk and bead coin purse (American), ca. 1830-1850.

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Beaded purse or wallet (French), 18th century.
From the Victoria & Albert Museum.
According to the V&A: “Many workshops in early eighteenth century France produced small purses. The finest work was in beadwork, in particular the sable-worked, drawstring purses and wallets of the mid-eighteenth century, so finely beaded they resembled grains of sand. They were made in specialist workshops in Paris using up to 1000 per square inch of extremely small and fine glass Bohemian and Venetian beads. This purse is inscribed IAME MON ESCLAVAGE and ICY EST MON SECRET, the monogram and motto of Marie Antoinette. The purse may have been associated with her or her court circle.”

Beaded purse or wallet (French), 18th century.

From the Victoria & Albert Museum.

According to the V&A: “Many workshops in early eighteenth century France produced small purses. The finest work was in beadwork, in particular the sable-worked, drawstring purses and wallets of the mid-eighteenth century, so finely beaded they resembled grains of sand. They were made in specialist workshops in Paris using up to 1000 per square inch of extremely small and fine glass Bohemian and Venetian beads. This purse is inscribed IAME MON ESCLAVAGE and ICY EST MON SECRET, the monogram and motto of Marie Antoinette. The purse may have been associated with her or her court circle.

Embroidered silk purse (Italian), ca. 1700-30.
From the Victoria & Albert Museum.
According to the V&A: “The splendour of 18th-century purses, embroidered with silks and metal thread, is difficult to surpass. This little early 18th century pochette is made of white satin embroidered with polychrome silks, silver-gilt wire, silver-gilt strip and braid in satin stitch, couching and speckling with french knots. Two tasselled strings of silver-gilt thread are attached to the flap and a looped fringe of silver-gilt thread runs around the edges.”

Embroidered silk purse (Italian), ca. 1700-30.

From the Victoria & Albert Museum.

According to the V&A: “The splendour of 18th-century purses, embroidered with silks and metal thread, is difficult to surpass. This little early 18th century pochette is made of white satin embroidered with polychrome silks, silver-gilt wire, silver-gilt strip and braid in satin stitch, couching and speckling with french knots. Two tasselled strings of silver-gilt thread are attached to the flap and a looped fringe of silver-gilt thread runs around the edges.

What kind of dresses would have been worn in Austria in 1930s?

omgthatdress:

the same as everywhere else.

Chiming in here…Tracht/Dirndl were still worn by some women, especially in rural areas, and by everyone on special occasions.

Silk purse with metal and glass details, ca. 1675-1700.
From the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Silk purse with metal and glass details, ca. 1675-1700.

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Embroidered purse, late 17th century.
From the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Embroidered purse, late 17th century.

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Steel purse frame (Austrian), late 17th century.
From the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Steel purse frame (Austrian), late 17th century.

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Embroidered linen purse (British), first half of the 17th century.
From the Victoria & Albert Museum.

Embroidered linen purse (British), first half of the 17th century.

From the Victoria & Albert Museum.

lookingforlovely:

kathtea:

1940s New Look Underwear (x)

The “New Look” of the late 40’s is one of my favourites. It’s awesome to see the structure underneath the dresses.

Iron purse frame, 15th-16th century.
From the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Iron purse frame, 15th-16th century.

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Purse frame (British), late 15th century.
From the Victoria & Albert Museum.

Purse frame (British), late 15th century.

From the Victoria & Albert Museum.

Velvet brocade purse in an iron frame (Northern European), late 15th century.
From the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Velvet brocade purse in an iron frame (Northern European), late 15th century.

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Embroidered silk & linen purse (British), ca. 1575-1600.
From the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Embroidered silk & linen purse (British), ca. 1575-1600.

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Linen purse with heraldic designs, ca. 1540.
From the Victoria & Albert Museum.
According to the V&A: “This formal, heraldic purse associated with marriage has more significance than a purse used simply for money, or a ‘swete-bag’ used for carrying perfumed herbs to sweeten the atmosphere. Both men and women carried or wore pouches or purses. The long strings of this example suggest that it was intended to hang from the waist, but it is uncertain whether it was ever actually used as a container. English purses of this date are extremely rare and the survival of this one may be due to its formal role, which meant that it was rarely used and thought worth looking after.”

Linen purse with heraldic designs, ca. 1540.

From the Victoria & Albert Museum.

According to the V&A: “This formal, heraldic purse associated with marriage has more significance than a purse used simply for money, or a ‘swete-bag’ used for carrying perfumed herbs to sweeten the atmosphere. Both men and women carried or wore pouches or purses. The long strings of this example suggest that it was intended to hang from the waist, but it is uncertain whether it was ever actually used as a container. English purses of this date are extremely rare and the survival of this one may be due to its formal role, which meant that it was rarely used and thought worth looking after.”